About me

Hi. I’m Professor in Conservation Ecology in the Biosciences School at the University of Melbourne and one of the PIs in the QAECO group. I’m interested in uncertainty and conservation decision making. I coordinate and teach 3rd year Applied Ecology  I’m the Director of the Commonwealth Government funded National Environment Science Program Threatened Species Recovery Hub (NESP TSR), and I’m a theme leader in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions. I publish on technical and policy issues around conservation and natural resource management, including optimal conservation investment, optimal monitoring and adaptive management, systematic conservation planning, population viability analysis, and habitat modelling and mapping. I like walking in the bush, looking at animals and plants.  And soccer.

Working in QAECO is a wonderful thing largely because of the all brilliant group members that span all career stages, and who represent a huge variety of cultures and orientations. As a large and diverse research collaboration, we value diversity and inclusion. To get more of an idea of what I mean by that, please take a peek at our diversity and inclusion page.

My CV.

Contact

brendanwATunimelb.edu.au

+61 3 8344 3306

pretending to think about ecology

I’m the one at the back

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7 Responses to About me

  1. Pingback: IPBES « emily nicholson

  2. Pingback: Interpreting non-detection when observations are imperfect | Michael McCarthy's Research

  3. Pingback: Optimal monitoring when detectability varies – my talk at #ESAus2012 | Michael McCarthy's Research

  4. Pingback: The Quantitative & Applied Ecology Group

  5. Pingback: Congratulations to our qaeco grant-getters! | The Quantitative & Applied Ecology Group

  6. Ken Hall says:

    I have seen a Tasmanian Tiger and know of a spot where they cross. They are still alive but best left alone. I might even set some Trail Cams up there to prove it. I know an old bloke who could take you to a spot in Tasmania where Tasmanian Tigers also crossed his property all the time when he was a kid. So they are still about and with modern car cams it is only a matter of time before a confirmed sighting. And no doubt who get’s that picture will make money out of it.

  7. Pingback: Fact check: Is Queensland clearing land as fast as Brazil? - Newsgrio | USA News

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